Welcome from Bishop Zinkula!

Welcome to the Diocese of Davenport vocations website!  I have been privileged to be recently made bishop here in southeast Iowa.  It is a place of faith-filled lay people, religious and clergy.  We have large churches and small ones nestled in cities and farm lands.

I have been a priest for over 25 years and know the joy of serving Christ and God’s people as a priest.  I have been invited into the lives of countless people in good times and difficult times, in extraordinary and very ordinary situations.

Some people feel called to join a religious community, and some feel called to diocesan priesthood.  Most of our diocesan priests serve the people in parishes.

Perhaps that is getting a little ahead of your story and why you came to this website.  If you have an interest in priesthood, especially diocesan priesthood, I invite you to look at this site.  Somehow God is stirring your heart.  I hope you will listen and explore.  Discernment is part of what is done in determining a vocation.  Ask yourself the question, “What is God asking of me?”  If you don’t look and listen you will never know.

I pray for all those who come here looking.  Jesus said to the first disciples, “Come and see.”

Sincerely in Christ,

Most Rev. Thomas Zinkula
Bishop of Davenport

 

2ND THURSDAY OF ADVENT - MEMORIAL OF SAINT JOHN OF THE CROSS
MATTHEW 11:11-15

Friends, today’s Gospel affirms the greatness of John the Baptist. I think it’s fair to say that you cannot really understand Jesus without understanding John, which is precisely why all four Evangelists tell the story of the Baptist as a kind of overture to the story of Jesus.

John did not draw attention to himself. Rather, he presented himself as a preparation, a forerunner, a prophet preparing the way of the Lord. He was summing up much of Israelite history, but stressing that this history was open-ended, unfinished.

And therefore, how powerful it was when, upon spying Jesus coming to be baptized, he said, "Behold the Lamb of God." No first-century Israelite would have missed the meaning of that: behold the one who has come to be sacrificed. Behold the sacrifice, which will sum up, complete, and perfect the Temple. Moreover, behold the Passover lamb, who sums up the whole meaning of that event and brings it to fulfillment.

And this is why John says, "He must increase and I must decrease." In other words, the overture is complete; and now the great opera begins. The preparatory work of Israel is over, and now the Messiah will reign.

-Bishop Robert Barron, Word on Fire Advent Gospel Reflections, Dec. 14, 2017
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

2ND WEDNESDAY OF ADVENT - MEMORIAL OF SAINT LUCY
MATTHEW 11:28-30

Friends, in today’s Gospel, Jesus is not offering us one more philosophy of God. He is offering us the view from the inside of the Trinity. And that is why we should respond to his compelling invitation: "Come to me, all you who labor and are burdened, and I will give you rest."

What everyone wants is rest, but not in the sense of relaxation. Rest here means achievement of joy. The great illusion is that joy will come from filling up the ego with goods. In fact, it will come from emptying out, from turning one’s life over to the direction of God.

We also find in today’s Gospel those extraordinary words: "Take my yoke upon you and learn from me." Jesus himself is bearing the yoke that he speaks of since he is yoked to the Father, doing only what he sees the Father doing. Jesus is, in his innermost nature, the one who listens and obeys.

What he is saying, therefore, is to stand next to him, just as one ox stands next to the other as they pull together. Just as Jesus is yoked to the Father, so we should be yoked to him, obeying him as he obeys the Father.

-Bishop Robert Barron, Word on Fire Advent Gospel Reflections, Dec. 13, 2017
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

2ND TUESDAY OF ADVENT - FEAST OF OUR LADY OF GUADALUPE
LUKE 1:39-47

Friends, today we celebrate the great feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe. What followed the apparition of Mary at Tepeyac is one of the most astounding chapters in the history of Christian evangelism.

Though Franciscan missionaries had been laboring in Mexico for twenty years, they had made little progress. But within ten years of the appearance of Our Lady of Guadalupe, practically the entire Mexican people, nine million strong, had converted to Christianity. La Morena had proved a more effective evangelist than St. Peter, St. Paul, St. Patrick, and St. Francis Xavier combined! And with that great national conversion, the Aztec practice of human sacrifice came to an end. She had done battle with fallen spirits and had won a culture-changing victory for the God of love.

The challenge for us who honor her today is to join the same fight. We must announce to our culture today the truth of the God of Israel, the God of Jesus Christ, the God of nonviolence and forgiving love. And we ought, like La Morena, to be bearers of Jesus to a world that needs him more than ever.

-Bishop Robert Barron, Word on Fire Advent Gospel Reflections, Dec. 12, 2017
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook