Welcome from Bishop AmosBishop Amos Clerics Picture C 5504_042

Welcome to the Diocese of Davenport vocations website!  I have been privileged to serve as bishop here in southeast Iowa for almost ten years.  It is a place of faith-filled lay people, religious and clergy.  We have large churches and small ones nestled in cities and farm lands.

I have been a priest for over 45 years and know the joy of serving Christ and God’s people as a priest.  I have been invited into the lives of countless people in good times and difficult times, in extraordinary and very ordinary situations.

Some people feel called to join a religious community, and some feel called to diocesan priesthood.  Most of our diocesan priests serve the people in parishes.

Perhaps that is getting a little ahead of your story and why you came to this website.  If you have an interest in priesthood, especially diocesan priesthood, I invite you to look at this site.  Somehow God is stirring your heart.  I hope you will listen and explore.  Discernment is part of what is done in determining a vocation.  Ask yourself the question, “What is God asking of me?”  If you don’t look and listen you will never know.

I pray for all those who come here looking.  Jesus said to the first disciples, “Come and see.”

Sincerely in Christ,

Most Rev. Martin Amos
Bishop of Davenport

 

You are not far from the Kingdom of God.
—Mark 12:34

Over a decade ago when I became Catholic, I felt like God lived at St. Gregory’s Church. I’d walk my dog and look up the street, trying to catch a glimpse of its red bricks, imagining God flickering in the sanctuary candle. Earlier, when I was little, I felt like God lived in the trees. Both times it was a sense that God was not far, just up the block or above our heads. But today Jesus tells a scribe he’s not far from the kingdom because he’s understood the centrality of loving God and loving your neighbor. In other words, the kingdom is present wherever love brings what is inside us into communion with what lies beyond. So if only I could hold these things together—my heart, the trees, the church—I think I would not be far indeed.

-Living Lent Daily, Loyola Press
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Retweeted Pope Francis (@Pontifex):

Fasting is fruitful when accompanied by concrete expressions of love towards our neigbors, especially those in difficulty.
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Whoever is not with me is against me, and whoever does not gather with me scatters.
—Luke 11:23

I recently read an essay by Holly Taylor, a convert from the Episcopal Church to Catholicism. Her central reason for converting was unity. Many churches fragment over conflict. But she claims that for a community to thrive, it must be committed to those it opposes. “In the mysterious calculus of the divine economy,” she writes, unity “allows the possibility that it is precisely the love, the goodness, even of someone with whom I am at odds at the moment, that brings me to God.”

Salvation happens in community. When that community scatters, we lose bits of ourselves and some of the ways God planned to reach us. So we must gather together, despite our differences, for as Taylor says, “Our best chance may be hanging on to one another’s heels.”

-Living Lent Daily, Loyola Press
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